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Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

Infinite Earth Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo and the Local Government Commission and hosted by Mike Hancox and Vernice Miller-Travis. Each week they interview visionary leaders, dedicated government officials, savvy businesses and forward thinking individuals who are working to build smarter, more equitable, sustainable, and prosperous communities through social and economic inclusion that values the contribution of all citizens and seeks meaningful lives for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up and building great 21st century communities, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Smart Growth, Prosperity and Sustainability are not possible without social, civic, and economic inclusion for people of all economic, social, and racial backgrounds.
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Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities
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Now displaying: April, 2018
Apr 26, 2018

Topic:
Providing local food to the local community


Guests:
Stacey Givens is the farmer, chef and owner of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen in Northeast Portland, Oregon’s Cully Neighborhood. Givens grows diverse organic produce for Portland’s top restaurants and provides food, education and opportunity to her community. Givens was raised the youngest of seven children in a large Greek family in Redondo Beach, California where she was instilled with do-it-yourself values from a young age, farming in their backyard garden and small orchard, foraging with her mom, picking and brining olives and helping prepare large Greek family-style suppers. Givens has been in the food industry since age 15. She worked her way up the West Coast, including at the nationally acclaimed Millennium in San Francisco, before landing in Portland in 2006. Givens established The Side Yard Farm in 2009. The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen currently consists of several urban farm lots maintained by Givens and her team, a farm-to-table private catering company, and the ‘Nomadic Chef’ supper club where she features her urban-grown goods. Givens also organizes invaluable community services at The Side Yard like DIY workshops, grief support groups and kids camps. While The Side Yard has a hyperlocal focus, Givens’ drive to build a strong community and make lasting connections with talented and passionate people is globally-minded, traveling around the world to meet fellow organic farmers and chefs. In 2014, Givens was the recipient of Portland’s Local Hero award in the chef category, and continues to give back to the community she loves through volunteerism and her indispensable work at The Side Yard. In 2015, she competed on the Foodnetwork’s ‘Chopped’ and brought home the win for Portland.

Stacey Givens Twitter
https://twitter.com/thesideyardpdx

Organization:
The Side Yard is an urban farm, supper club and catering company located in the NE Cully Neighborhood in Portland, Oregon. Since 2009 they have provided local restaurants with creative organic produce and the community with food, education and opportunity. The farm is largely operated by volunteers and interns who gain hands on experience with the urban seed to plate movement. The Side Yard offers urban farm suppers & brunches, private catering, nomadic pop-ups, educational DIY workshops, farm tours and grief groups. Their focus is to provide local food for the local community, from the seeds they sow, animals they raise, and to the craftsmanship they embrace.

 

Take Away Quotes:
“It’s all about the experience of seed to plate. All of that was harvested the day before, the day of. You can just taste the freshness and that connection of hyper local.”

“After I lost my father I decided I’m done with going to grief groups in hospitals- why not have one at the farm. It’s such a beautiful place and I think it’d be easier for people to share the loss of their loved one…and we just become this big ole family.”

“I hope that what we’re doing is we’re teaching people that being local is really important, being organic is extremely important, and I guess that’s what I would hope for is that we’re doing our job educating people and bringing them closer to their food.”


Resources:
The Side Yard
http://www.thesideyardpdx.com/

Presidio Graduate School
http://www.presidio.edu

Apr 19, 2018
Topic:
Urban Resilience Series – Addressing public health disparities
 
Guest & Organization:
Suzanne Bohan covered health and science for 12 years with the Bay Area News Group, a 650,000-circulation newspaper chain which includes the San Jose Mercury News, Contra Costa Times, and Oakland Tribune. She previously worked for the Sacramento Bee, and her writing has also been published in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Miami Herald, San Francisco Chronicle, and other newspapers nationwide.
 
Bohan has won nearly 20 journalism awards, including the 2010 White House Correspondents’ Association Edgar A. Poe award for the series “Shortened Lives: Where You Live Matters” on why life expectancies vary so dramatically between nearby neighborhoods, and initiatives to shrink this unjust gap. Her earlier book, 50 Simple Ways to Live a Longer Life: Everyday Techniques from the Forefront of Science, won a National Health Information Award for health promotion/disease prevention. Bohan has a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree in biology from San Francisco State University. She interned at CNN and worked in radio, but decided to focus her
career on print media. She lives in Northern California with her husband.
 
In Twenty Years of Life, award-winning health journalist Suzanne Bohan exposes the disturbing flip side of the American dream: your health is largely determined by your zip code. The strain of living in a poor neighborhood, with sub-par schools, lack of parks, fear of violence, few to no healthy food options, and the stress of unpaid bills is literally taking years off people’s lives.
 
Residents living in distressed communities die upwards of 20 years earlier than those living in wealthier neighborhoods often just miles away. But there is another way. In Twenty Years of Life, Bohan tells a success story that has resulted in the passage of more than 500 new policies and laws that are improving millions of resident’s lives. 
 
Resources:
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Apr 12, 2018
Topic:
The arts and community engagement as highly effective community and economic development strategies
 
Guest & Organization:
Juanita Hardy is the Senior Visiting Fellow (SVF) for Creative Placemaking at the Urban Land Institute (ULI). Her work supports the Institute’s Building Healthy Places Initiative by deepening and broadening ULI’s focus on creative placemaking through content, the ULIDistrict Council network, and the HealthyCorridors grant program.
 
Hardy has a passion for making business and cultural connections that foster healthy,thriving, and culturally rich places to work, live, and enjoy. 
 
She founded Tiger Management Consulting Group, a global training and business consulting services firm, after retiring from IBM in 2005.  Hardy has over 43 years of business experience, including 31 years with IBM, and over 35 years in the arts as a nonprofit leader, trustee, collector, and patron of the arts.  For IBM, she led many client transformational leadership initiatives and frequently coached leaders on making change at the individual and organizational level.  Her work with Tiger Management included helping clients build successful relationships with businesses in other countries and cultures.
 
As SVF for ULI, Hardy has done extensive research and identified best practices, conducted an assessment on the presence of creative placemaking at ULI, worked with ULI District Councils on programming and capacity building activities, and authored a guide on implementing creative placemaking in real estate development.
 
Hardy is the former Executive Director of CulturalDC,
a nonprofit committed to making space for artists and art organizations and fostering cultural and economic vibrancy in communities through its creative placemaking services. While at CulturalDC, she worked closely with area developers to integrate arts and culture into development projects across the Washington, D.C., area. She served as an awards program juror for the ULI Washington District Council’s Real
Estate Trends Conference for three years, 2015-2017. Since
2006, Hardy has served as an executive coach with Right Management, a global human capital development firm, and has served on many nonprofit art boards dating to the 1980s. She co-founded Millennium
Arts Salon, an art education initiative, in 2000. Hardy is an accomplished writer and public speaker.  Her recent writing includes a trilogy of creative placemaking articles in Urban Land magazine.
 
Resources:
Apr 5, 2018
Topic:
Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – Advancing environmental justice and equity at the state and local levels
 
Guest & Organization:
Dr. Adrienne L. Hollis is the Director of Federal Policy at WE ACT for Environmental Justice, in the Washington, DC office. Dr. Hollis is an experienced environmental toxicologist as well as an environmental attorney. She has worked with a number of community organizations and has a wealth of experience in community-based participatory research around environmental justice issues.
 
It is well-documented that some of the most polluted environments in America are where people of color live, work, play, and pray. WE ACT was started in 1988 when three fearless community leaders saw that environmental racism was rampant in their West Harlem neighborhood, and they demanded community-driven, political change. Today, the organization has grown to over 16 staff members and 2 locations in NYC and Washington, D.C., and is considered an active and respected participant in the national Environmental Justice Movement.
 
WE ACT’s mission is to build healthy communities by ensuring that people of color and/or low-income residents participate meaningfully in the creation of sound and fair environmental health and protection policies and practices.
 
WE ACT envisions a community that has:
 
  • informed and engaged residents who participate fully in decision-making on key issues that impact their health and community.
  • strong and equal environmental protections. 
  • increased environmental health through community-based participatory research and evidence-based campaigns.
 
Resources:
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