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Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

Infinite Earth Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo and the Local Government Commission and hosted by Mike Hancox and Vernice Miller-Travis. Each week they interview visionary leaders, dedicated government officials, savvy businesses and forward thinking individuals who are working to build smarter, more equitable, sustainable, and prosperous communities through social and economic inclusion that values the contribution of all citizens and seeks meaningful lives for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up and building great 21st century communities, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Smart Growth, Prosperity and Sustainability are not possible without social, civic, and economic inclusion for people of all economic, social, and racial backgrounds.
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Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities
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Jul 19, 2018

Topic:
Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – data-driven tools to assist in decision making.

Guest & Organization:
Joe is Principal and Co-Founder of UrbanFootprint (formerly Calthorpe Analytics). He leverages more than 20 years of experience in land use and transportation planning in leading the development and deployment of the UrbanFootprint software platform. His career has focused on the implementation of actionable, data-driven tools that bring critical information to land use planning decisions, energy and water resource choices, and the environmental, public health, and social equity challenges of our times.

Joe has led some of the most complex planning and design projects in the US and globally, including the award-winning Envision Utah regional plan, post-hurricane recovery in Southern Louisiana, and major scenario modeling and design efforts in Los Angeles, Mexico City, and the Middle East. He now leads UrbanFootprint, a web-based software platform designed to optimize each step of
the sustainable urban planning and design process by supporting planners and communities with easy access to data science and advanced scenario planning.

Joe holds a Master’s in Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of California at Berkeley. He lives in Berkeley, California with his wife and two children and is an avid cyclist.

Resources:
UrbanFootprint - Urban Planning Software for Sustainable Cities
Local Government Commission
Jul 12, 2018
Topic:
Urban Resilience Series – public transit that reflects your values 
 
Guest & Organization:
Jarrett Walker is an international consultant in public transit network design and policy, with 25 years of experience planning public transit in North America, Europe, Russia, Australia, and New Zealand.  His firm Jarrett Walker and Associates, based in Portland, Oregon, provides transit planning and executive advice to clients worldwide. 
 
He has worked in about 100 cities, including successful network redesign projects in Houston, Anchorage, Canberra, and Auckland. 
His firm is currently undertaking network design studies in Philadelphia and Dublin, among many others.
 
Heis a frequent keynote speaker, both at conferences and at events building a city's interest and understanding of the public transit challenges.
 
He is a well-known innovator in describing transit issues to the public, in building values-based policies and standards, and in running interactive design processes for transit plans.  His training
programs range from executive workshops to two-day intensive courses.
 
about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives, was published by Island Press in 2011.  The book offers an introduction to transit issues for the average reader, designed to help anyone form clearer views that reflect their own values.  In addition to his consulting, teaching, and speaking, he writes about public transit issues at HumanTransit.org.
 
Practically interested in an impractical number of fields, he is probably the only person with peer-reviewed articles in both the Journal of Transport Geography and Shakespeare Quarterly.
 
Resources:
Jul 5, 2018

Topic:

The role of sports in increasing social mobility and improving communities

Guest & Organization:

Lisa Wrightsman is the Regional Program Manager of Street Soccer USA Sacramento and the Founder and Coach of Sacramento Lady Salamanders. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication with a concentration in Digital Video from California State University, Sacramento. She was a member of the University's NCAA Division I Women's Soccer team and currently holds multiple program records as well as recognition as a member of the All-Decade team. After college she played over five years of semi professional soccer for the Elk Grove Pride.

Today her passion for soccer is seen in her social entrepreneurship initiatives with Street Soccer USA; a nationwide non-profit that uses soccer to break the cycle of homelessness and domestic abuse. Lisa is the founder and current Director and Coach of Street Soccer USA’s Sacramento Lady Salamanders. She started this program in 2010 and has since seen tremendous results and growth of the program as it has proven to successfully reverse the effects of addiction and domestic violence in 92% of team participants. Street Soccer USA uses this team platform to create a training curriculum of job preparation, life skills, and other specialized services, ultimately connecting participants directly to jobs, education, and housing.

Lisa was recognized in 2015, as one of Sacramento Business Journal’s top 40 Under 40 young professionals. She is a Senior Fellow of the Nehemiah Emerging Leader’s Program. Since 2010 Lisa has coached the USA Women’s Street Soccer team at the Homeless World Cup and in 2016 was selected as Women's Coach of the Tournament. Most recently Lisa was selected as a 2016 Change-Maker by TEDx Sacramento where she shared her story of resilience, hope, and how to be a catalyst for change

Resources:

Street Soccer USA

Local Government Commission

Jun 28, 2018
Topic:  Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – using science to advance community priorities
 
Guest & Organization: 
 
Raj Pandya directs the American Geophysical Union (AGU)’s Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX). TEX helps volunteer scientists and community leaders work together to use science, especially Earth and space science, to advance community priorities related to sustainability,
resilience, disaster risk reduction, and environmental justice.
 
Raj’s work invites everyone to be part of guiding and doing science, especially people from historically marginalized communities, so that science can contribute to a world where all people and all creatures can thrive, now and in the future.
 
Raj chairs the National Academies committee on “Designing Citizen Science to Support Science Learning” and serves on the boards for Public Lab and the Anthropocene Alliance.  He was a founding member of the board of the Citizen Science Association and has helped lead education and diversity-related activities for the American Meteorological Society. As part of TEX, Raj helped launch the Resilience Dialogues – a public-private partnership that uses facilitated online dialogues to advance community resilience.
 
Formerly, Raj led Spark Science Education and SOARS, both part of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). While at UCAR, he led a team that worked with Navrongo Health Research to Centre using weather data to better manage meningitis in Africa. He also co-hosted, with indigenous leaders, UCAR’s first conference on indigenous knowledge and climate science “Planning for Seven Generations”. Prior to joining UCAR, Raj served as a faculty member at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. 
 
Raj got his Ph.D. from the University of Washington exploring how large thunderstorms grow and sustain themselves.
 
Resources:
 
California Adaptation Forum – Register for California’s Premier Adaptation Gathering taking place in Sacramento, CA on August 27-29, 2018!
Jun 21, 2018
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – emerging mobility trends
 
Guest & Organization:
Christopher Cabaldon was first elected Mayor of West Sacramento in 1998 and is serving his ninth term. He is the first mayor elected directly by the voters of the city, after serving three terms on the city council. The Sacramento Bee says that “under his leadership, the city has become one of the municipal stars of the region.”
 
At the United States Conference of Mayors, he is Chair of the Jobs, Education, and the Workforce Committee and one of the nation’s leading mayors on innovation, ports, and exports, civil rights, and education. An appointee in the administrations of four California governors spanning both political parties, Mr. Cabaldon currently serves as California’s commissioner on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education, where he is chair of the issues analysis & research committee.
 
Mayor Cabaldon’s work on transportation, land use, water, air quality and climate change, housing, and economic development at the local, regional, and statewide scales has won numerous awards, and has become the model for effective regional collaborative action. Mr. Cabaldon earned his B.S. in environmental economics from UC Berkeley, and a Master of Public Policy & Administration degree from CSU Sacramento, where he received the Distinguished Alumni Award. 
 
Resources:
City of West Sacramento’s Via On-Demand Rideshare - link to download the Via app, get information on the Pilot, and find links out to Via’s Support page and additional FAQs
Jun 14, 2018
Topic:
Urban Resilience Series – growth in American cities
 
Guest & Organization:
Alan Mallach is a senior fellow at the Center for Community Progress in Washington, DC. He is the author of many works on housing and planning, including Bringing Buildings Back and Building a Better Urban Future: New Directions for Housing Policies in Weak Market Cities. He has served as director of housing and economic development for Trenton, N.J. as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, and as a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.    
 
Resources:
Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store

 

Jun 7, 2018
Topic:
Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – transportation inequity
 
Guest & Organization:
Tracee Strum-Gilliam, AICP is the Director of Mid-Atlantic Client Solutions for PRR. For her, working at PRR is thrilling! The core part of her position at PRR is to grow the Baltimore office and PRR’s transportation and infrastructure practice on the East Coast. As a 20-year veteran of the transportation industry, it is most certainly a challenge that she welcomes, because she loves helping clients solve challenges and achieve their goals through strategic planning. She is a proud member of several Transportation Research Board committees, Women in Transportation Seminar Baltimore Chapter, and the Waterfront Partnership Board of Baltimore. When she’s not working, she’s traveling with my family. She always has a passport handy and a suitcase ready.
PRR specializes in advancing major public issues and sparking market transformation across a diverse range of segments that include environmenttransportationhealthcare, and land use.
 
Resources:
May 31, 2018
Topic:
Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – getting adaptation and resilience projects to move forward
 
Guest & Organization:
Ellory Monks is co-founder of The Atlas Marketplace, a free online community for public officials upgrading their systems to be stronger, smarter and more sustainable.
 
The Atlas is a hassle-free space where cities come to learn, share, and connect about what’s working in their communities. As co-founder, Ellory works with 70+ partner cities to help them scale and replicate proven urban innovations – and the benefits they generate – in their own communities. Prior to co-founding The Atlas, Ellory was Partner at re:focus partners, a firm dedicated to the design & financing of resilient infrastructure, and before that, held a fellowship in Washington D.C., where she acted as the executive secretary of the Obama Administration’s Climate Data and Tools Initiative, and more broadly, provided analytical and technical support to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She has a B.A. in Civil & Environmental Engineering and Public Policy from Rice University.
 
Resources:
Atlas Marketplace – access is free!
May 24, 2018
Topic:
Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – integrating new mobility technology into cities
 
Guest & Organization:
Working out of BB&K’s Washington, D.C. office,
Greg uses his unique experience working on Capitol Hill and as in-house counsel for a transportation planning agency to provide legal and regulatory guidance concerning federal grant and contracting requirements, and monitors, counsels and advocates for clients on federal legislation, rulemakings and funding opportunities related to transportation infrastructure. Greg’s practice includes providing strategic guidance, policy tracking, and legal assistance on
the regulation and incorporation of emerging transportation technologies into our transportation network, including on-demand mobility, automated and connected vehicles, and drones. Greg is a co-host on the @MobilityPodcast and can be found on Twitter at @smartertranspo.
 
Resources:
May 17, 2018
Topic:
Urban Resilience Series – Resiliency planning, equity and community-driven design
 
Guest & Organization:
Barbara Brown Wilson is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. Barbara Brown Wilson’s research and teaching focus on the ethics, theory, and practice of sustainable community design and development, and on the history of urban social movements.
 
Wilson's current research projects include understanding how grassroots community networks reframe public infrastructure in more climate and culturally appropriate ways across the U.S. and helping to elevate the standards of evaluation for community-engaged design around notions of social and ecological justice. Her research is often change-oriented—she collaborates with real community partners to identify opportunities for engaged and integrated sustainable development.  She is a member of the Equity Collective, whose work is currently featured in the Cooper Hewitt Museum's By the People: Designing a Better America Exhibition. Alongside Architect Jeana Ripple, Wilson is coordinating the community engaged aspects of the Public Art Installation for the ArtHouse Social Kitchen Project in Gary, Indiana. She is also working, as a researcher, an educator, and a board member of the Piedmont Housing Alliance (PHA) with their leadership
to identify venues where PHA residents can more actively engage in and shape their communities. In those collective posts, Wilson is serving as a resource ally to PHA's new Youth Leadership in Land Use program that brings in resident youth from Friendship Court as valued members of the design team for the Redevelopment project currently underway in their neighborhood.
 
She is a co-founder of the Design Futures Student Leadership Forum, a five day student leadership training which convenes students and faculty from a consortium of universities with leading practitioners all working to elevate the educational realms of community-engaged design; and a co-founder of the Austin Community Design and Development Center (ACDDC), a nonprofit design center that provides high quality green design and planning services to lower income households and the organizations that serve them.
 
Resources:
Download
the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here,
and find it on Google
Play and Apple
May 10, 2018
Topic:
 
Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – current political climate in Charlottesville and beyond
 
Guest & Organization:
 
Dayna Bowen Matthew is the William L. Matheson and Robert M. Morgenthau Distinguished Professor of Law and F. Palmer Weber Research Professor of Civil Liberties and Human Rights at the University of Virginia. Matthew is a leader in public health who focuses on racial disparities in healthcare. She joined the Virginia faculty in 2017. She is the author of the book "Just Medicine: A Cure for Racial Inequality in American Health Care."
 
Matthew previously served on the University of Colorado law faculty as a professor, vice dean and associate dean of academic affairs. She was a member of theCenter for Bioethics and Humanities on the Anschutz Medical Campus and held a joint appointment at the Colorado School of Public Health.
 
She has also taken on many public policy roles. Matthew worked with a law firm partner in 2013 to found the Colorado Health Equity Project, a medical-legal partnership incubator aimed at removing barriers to good health for low-income clients by providing legal representation, research, and policy advocacy. In 2015 she served as the senior adviser to the director of the Office of Civil Rights for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she expedited cases on behalf of historically vulnerable communities besieged by pollution. She then became a member of the health policy team for U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan and worked on public health issues.
 
During 2015 and 2016 she was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow, in residence in Washington, D.C., and pivoted her work toward population-level clients. She forged relationships with influential policy groups such as the Brookings Institution, where she is currently a non-resident senior fellow, and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation.
 
Resources:
May 3, 2018
Topic:
SmartGrowth and Livable Communities Series – active transportation and community design
 
Guest & Organization:
Peter Katz has been a leader in advancing innovative approaches to community planning for more than two decades. He played a catalytic role in launching the New Urbanism by writing a seminal book, The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community, and serving as the founding executive director of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU). During Peter’s tenure, CNU adopted its charter, obtained its first grant funding, began a strategic partnership with the U.S.
 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, and convened its first international congress. He was recently named a fellow of CNU in recognition of his contributions to the movement. As strategic consultant to government, public agencies, and private-sector clients, Peter addresses real-world needs with state-of-the-art planning practices. He has also played a key role in shaping and implementing a range of nationally significant community design and development projects.
 
Resources:
Apr 26, 2018

Topic:
Providing local food to the local community


Guests:
Stacey Givens is the farmer, chef and owner of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen in Northeast Portland, Oregon’s Cully Neighborhood. Givens grows diverse organic produce for Portland’s top restaurants and provides food, education and opportunity to her community. Givens was raised the youngest of seven children in a large Greek family in Redondo Beach, California where she was instilled with do-it-yourself values from a young age, farming in their backyard garden and small orchard, foraging with her mom, picking and brining olives and helping prepare large Greek family-style suppers. Givens has been in the food industry since age 15. She worked her way up the West Coast, including at the nationally acclaimed Millennium in San Francisco, before landing in Portland in 2006. Givens established The Side Yard Farm in 2009. The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen currently consists of several urban farm lots maintained by Givens and her team, a farm-to-table private catering company, and the ‘Nomadic Chef’ supper club where she features her urban-grown goods. Givens also organizes invaluable community services at The Side Yard like DIY workshops, grief support groups and kids camps. While The Side Yard has a hyperlocal focus, Givens’ drive to build a strong community and make lasting connections with talented and passionate people is globally-minded, traveling around the world to meet fellow organic farmers and chefs. In 2014, Givens was the recipient of Portland’s Local Hero award in the chef category, and continues to give back to the community she loves through volunteerism and her indispensable work at The Side Yard. In 2015, she competed on the Foodnetwork’s ‘Chopped’ and brought home the win for Portland.

Stacey Givens Twitter
https://twitter.com/thesideyardpdx

Organization:
The Side Yard is an urban farm, supper club and catering company located in the NE Cully Neighborhood in Portland, Oregon. Since 2009 they have provided local restaurants with creative organic produce and the community with food, education and opportunity. The farm is largely operated by volunteers and interns who gain hands on experience with the urban seed to plate movement. The Side Yard offers urban farm suppers & brunches, private catering, nomadic pop-ups, educational DIY workshops, farm tours and grief groups. Their focus is to provide local food for the local community, from the seeds they sow, animals they raise, and to the craftsmanship they embrace.

 

Take Away Quotes:
“It’s all about the experience of seed to plate. All of that was harvested the day before, the day of. You can just taste the freshness and that connection of hyper local.”

“After I lost my father I decided I’m done with going to grief groups in hospitals- why not have one at the farm. It’s such a beautiful place and I think it’d be easier for people to share the loss of their loved one…and we just become this big ole family.”

“I hope that what we’re doing is we’re teaching people that being local is really important, being organic is extremely important, and I guess that’s what I would hope for is that we’re doing our job educating people and bringing them closer to their food.”


Resources:
The Side Yard
http://www.thesideyardpdx.com/

Presidio Graduate School
http://www.presidio.edu

Apr 19, 2018
Topic:
Urban Resilience Series – Addressing public health disparities
 
Guest & Organization:
Suzanne Bohan covered health and science for 12 years with the Bay Area News Group, a 650,000-circulation newspaper chain which includes the San Jose Mercury News, Contra Costa Times, and Oakland Tribune. She previously worked for the Sacramento Bee, and her writing has also been published in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Miami Herald, San Francisco Chronicle, and other newspapers nationwide.
 
Bohan has won nearly 20 journalism awards, including the 2010 White House Correspondents’ Association Edgar A. Poe award for the series “Shortened Lives: Where You Live Matters” on why life expectancies vary so dramatically between nearby neighborhoods, and initiatives to shrink this unjust gap. Her earlier book, 50 Simple Ways to Live a Longer Life: Everyday Techniques from the Forefront of Science, won a National Health Information Award for health promotion/disease prevention. Bohan has a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree in biology from San Francisco State University. She interned at CNN and worked in radio, but decided to focus her
career on print media. She lives in Northern California with her husband.
 
In Twenty Years of Life, award-winning health journalist Suzanne Bohan exposes the disturbing flip side of the American dream: your health is largely determined by your zip code. The strain of living in a poor neighborhood, with sub-par schools, lack of parks, fear of violence, few to no healthy food options, and the stress of unpaid bills is literally taking years off people’s lives.
 
Residents living in distressed communities die upwards of 20 years earlier than those living in wealthier neighborhoods often just miles away. But there is another way. In Twenty Years of Life, Bohan tells a success story that has resulted in the passage of more than 500 new policies and laws that are improving millions of resident’s lives. 
 
Resources:
Download
the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here,
and find it on Google
Play and Apple
Apr 12, 2018
Topic:
The arts and community engagement as highly effective community and economic development strategies
 
Guest & Organization:
Juanita Hardy is the Senior Visiting Fellow (SVF) for Creative Placemaking at the Urban Land Institute (ULI). Her work supports the Institute’s Building Healthy Places Initiative by deepening and broadening ULI’s focus on creative placemaking through content, the ULIDistrict Council network, and the HealthyCorridors grant program.
 
Hardy has a passion for making business and cultural connections that foster healthy,thriving, and culturally rich places to work, live, and enjoy. 
 
She founded Tiger Management Consulting Group, a global training and business consulting services firm, after retiring from IBM in 2005.  Hardy has over 43 years of business experience, including 31 years with IBM, and over 35 years in the arts as a nonprofit leader, trustee, collector, and patron of the arts.  For IBM, she led many client transformational leadership initiatives and frequently coached leaders on making change at the individual and organizational level.  Her work with Tiger Management included helping clients build successful relationships with businesses in other countries and cultures.
 
As SVF for ULI, Hardy has done extensive research and identified best practices, conducted an assessment on the presence of creative placemaking at ULI, worked with ULI District Councils on programming and capacity building activities, and authored a guide on implementing creative placemaking in real estate development.
 
Hardy is the former Executive Director of CulturalDC,
a nonprofit committed to making space for artists and art organizations and fostering cultural and economic vibrancy in communities through its creative placemaking services. While at CulturalDC, she worked closely with area developers to integrate arts and culture into development projects across the Washington, D.C., area. She served as an awards program juror for the ULI Washington District Council’s Real
Estate Trends Conference for three years, 2015-2017. Since
2006, Hardy has served as an executive coach with Right Management, a global human capital development firm, and has served on many nonprofit art boards dating to the 1980s. She co-founded Millennium
Arts Salon, an art education initiative, in 2000. Hardy is an accomplished writer and public speaker.  Her recent writing includes a trilogy of creative placemaking articles in Urban Land magazine.
 
Resources:
Apr 5, 2018
Topic:
Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – Advancing environmental justice and equity at the state and local levels
 
Guest & Organization:
Dr. Adrienne L. Hollis is the Director of Federal Policy at WE ACT for Environmental Justice, in the Washington, DC office. Dr. Hollis is an experienced environmental toxicologist as well as an environmental attorney. She has worked with a number of community organizations and has a wealth of experience in community-based participatory research around environmental justice issues.
 
It is well-documented that some of the most polluted environments in America are where people of color live, work, play, and pray. WE ACT was started in 1988 when three fearless community leaders saw that environmental racism was rampant in their West Harlem neighborhood, and they demanded community-driven, political change. Today, the organization has grown to over 16 staff members and 2 locations in NYC and Washington, D.C., and is considered an active and respected participant in the national Environmental Justice Movement.
 
WE ACT’s mission is to build healthy communities by ensuring that people of color and/or low-income residents participate meaningfully in the creation of sound and fair environmental health and protection policies and practices.
 
WE ACT envisions a community that has:
 
  • informed and engaged residents who participate fully in decision-making on key issues that impact their health and community.
  • strong and equal environmental protections. 
  • increased environmental health through community-based participatory research and evidence-based campaigns.
 
Resources:
Mar 29, 2018
Topic:
Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – Issues Facing Coastal Communities
 
Guest & Organization:
Liz Williams Russell is the Coastal Community Resilience Director at the Foundation for Louisiana where she designs strategies to support communities influenced by land loss and relative sea-level rise across coastal Louisiana. With a background and training in architectural design, landscape systems, and urban planning, Liz incorporates the complexities of the developed urban ecosystem to promote equitable opportunities in areas altered and affected by land change. Liz manages coastal grant-making areas with an advisory committee and relevant partners that work to help communities face a range of issues and challenges that range in scale from mega-regional networks and hydrologic basins to stormwater management and flood insurance.
 
Risk mitigation and resilience-based programs require an awareness of and participation with these transitioning watersheds. In order to better provide opportunities, establish and cultivate partnerships, and advocate for informed and diverse public engagement, Liz supports fundraising initiatives and guides the common campaign and funding plan across Foundation for Louisiana’s Coastal Resiliency Leverage Fund.
 
Liz previously has worked as a Research Fellow and Affiliate with the Coastal Sustainability Studio at Louisiana State University. In this role she led and collaborated with cohorts of civil engineers, urban planners, coastal scientists, and landscape architects alongside economic, legal, and cultural advisors. Each project engaged a set of unique conditions within the coastal landscape and proposed developments through which residents and communities might advance and thrive in a future with evolving challenges.
 
The mission of the Foundation for Louisiana is to invest in people and practices that work to reduce vulnerability and build stronger, more sustainable communities statewide.
 
Resources:
Mar 22, 2018
Topic:
Adaptation and Livable Communities – An Introduction to Adaptation Professionals
 
Guest & Organization:
Beth Gibbons is the Executive Director of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP). In this role, she is responsible for strengthening ASAP as an emerging nonprofit organization, managing relationships with its members, board and donors, and bringing adaptation best practices into the broader urban conversation. Beth brings a decade of experience in sustainable development and climate adaptation to her role. Additionally, she has nonprofit management and governance experience and is highly skilled in climate communications, research and outreach, collaborative project management, and stakeholder management. Previously, Beth was Director of the University of Michigan Climate Center and managed NOAA’s Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center. She also worked for the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute as a research specialist, helping develop and implement the Great Lakes Adaptation Assessment for Cities. Previously, Beth worked for the International Forestry and Research Institute and the General Federation oF Women’s Clubs supporting organization operations and communications. She served in the Peace Corps in Agodopke, Togo. Beth earned her undergraduate degree in Comparative Politics from the Catholic University of America and holds a Master of Urban Planning from the University of Michigan.
ASAP connects and supports climate adaptation professionals, while advancing innovation in the field of climate change adaptation. Through ASAP’s website, affinity groups, webinars and meetings climate adaptation leaders interact, share what’s working, collaborate with their colleagues and build essential climate resilience for communities across the country.
 
Resources:
Mar 15, 2018
Topic:
Autonomous vehicles, shared vehicle services and electric vehicles
 
Guest & Organization:
Dr. Daniel Sperling is the Blue Planet Prize Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and Policy and founding director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis, which oversees the 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program.
He has held the transportation seat on the California Air Resources Board since 2007 (appointed by Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown) and served as Chair of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies in 2015-16. Among his many prizes are the 2013 Blue Planet Prize from the Asahi Glass Foundation for being "a pioneer in opening up new fields of study to create more efficient, low-carbon, and environmentally beneficial transportation systems."
He served twice as lead author for the IPCC (sharing the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize), has testified 7 times to the U.S. Congress, and provided 40 keynote presentations in the past five years. He has authored or coauthored over 250 technical papers and 12 books; is widely cited in leading newspapers; has been interviewed many times on NPR, including Science Friday, Talk of the Nation, and Fresh Air; and in 2009 was featured on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.
In Three Revolutions, transportation expert Dan Sperling, along with seven other leaders in the field, share research–based insights on potential public benefits and impacts of the three transportation revolutions. They describe innovative ideas and partnerships, and explore the role government policy can play in steering the new transportation paradigm toward the public interest—toward our dream scenario of social equity, environmental sustainability, and urban livability.
 
Resources:
Mar 8, 2018
Topic:
Urban revitalization and land regeneration
 
Guest & Organization:
Dekonti Mends-Cole serves as the Director of Policy for the Center for Community Progress. Prior to joining Center for Community Progress in September 2015, Dekonti worked in Detroit as the Deputy Director of Dispositions for the Detroit Land Bank Authority overseeing disposition, property management and compliance programs.  In addition, she served as a fellow with the White House Strong Cities, Strong Communities Initiative embedded in the City of Detroit’s Law Department.
Dekonti brings international experience and best practice having previously worked on local economic development projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa including infrastructure investment strategies in Iraq and Zambia for the United Nations and community development projects tied to the 2012 London Olympics. She holds an MSc from London School of Economics in Urban Regeneration and Affordable Housing, a Juris Doctor from Georgetown Law Center, and a BA from University of Miami in International Studies and Economics.
 
Resources:
Mar 1, 2018
Topic:
The relationship between tax and land use policies
 
Guest & Organization:
 
Joe Minicozzi is an urban planner imagining new ways to think about and visualize land use, urban design and economics. Joe founded Urban3 to break down and visualize the market dynamics created by tax and land use policies. Urban3's work is establishing new conversations across multiple sectors, policy makers, and the public to creatively address the challenges of urbanization. Urban3’s extensive studies have ranged geographically from over 30 states, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
 
Joe holds a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Miami and Master of Architecture and Urban Design from Harvard University. In 2017, Joe was recognized as one of the 100 Most Influential Urbanists of all time.
 
 
Resources:
 
Feb 22, 2018
Topic:
Post-disaster relief efforts to rebuild and revitalize Puerto Rico
 
Guest & Organization:
Elizabeth Yeampierre is a internationally recognized Puerto Rican attorney and environmental and climate justice leader of African and Indigenous ancestry born and raised in New York City. A national leader in climate justice movement, Elizabeth is the co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance. She is Executive Director of UPROSE, Brooklyn's oldest Latino community based organization. Her award winning vision for an inter-generational, multi-cultural and community led organization is the driving force behind UPROSE. She is a long-time advocate and trailblazer for community organizing around just, sustainable development, environmental justice and community-led climate adaptation and community resiliency in Sunset Park. Prior to assuming the Executive Director position at UPROSE, Ms. Yeampierre was the Director of Legal Education and Training at the Puerto Rican Legal Defense Fund, Director of Legal Services for the American Indian law Alliance and Dean of Puerto Rican Student Affairs at Yale University.  She holds a BA from Fordham University, a law degree from Northeastern University.
 
Resources:
Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Feb 15, 2018
Topic:
Smart growth and the real estate industry
 
Guest & Organization:
Hugh Morris has practiced urban planning for twenty-five years with a focus on transportation issues.  After graduating from UCLA with a Masters in Planning, he spent five years with a transportation consulting firm working on transit plans, travel demand forecasting models, and travel surveys.  He spent the next two years working for an energy efficiency think tank where he focused on transportation issues, including investigating the real cost of our transportation system.  The next ten years were spent working with the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy helping communities convert abandoned railroad corridors into hiking/biking trails.  His principle area of focus was urban trails that were used for trip making as well as recreation.  He has spent the last twelve years with the Smart Growth Program at the National Association of Realtors where he helps local Realtor associations around the country to become advocates for smart growth style development in their communities.
He has had two papers presented at and published by the National Academy of Science’s Transportation Research Board.  Additionally, he has contributed to the American Planning Association’s publication titled “Planning and Urban Design Standards” as well as “Trails for the 21st Century: a planning, design, and management manual” published by Island Press.
 
Resources:
Feb 8, 2018

Topic:

Holistic Approaches to Climate Challenges

Guest & Organization:

Senator Bob Wieckowski represents the 10th Senate District in the California State Legislature. The district stretches from southern Alameda County into Santa Clara County and shares the member’s focus on job creation, clean technologies, protecting our environment and reducing unnecessary regulations.

Mr. Wieckowski chairs the Environmental Quality Committee and Budget Subcommittee 2 on Resources, Environmental Protection, Energy and Transportation.  He is also a member of the Senate committees on Judiciary; Budget and Fiscal Review; Transportation and Housing; and Ethics.  He was appointed by Senate President Pro Tem to serve on the Energy and Environment Committee of the Council of State Governments West and in 2017 became the first Californian to chair the committee. The Senator is a state leader in advocating for climate adaptation programs and has participated on state and regional panels examining green infrastructure investments.

A strong voice in the Legislature for consumers and low-income earners, he received the “Champion of Justice” Award from the East Bay Community Law Center for fighting against abusive debt collectors and oppressive wage garnishments.  Statewide organizations have selected him Legislator of the Year and the California Judges Association gave him its “Scales of Justice Award” for his steadfast support for increased court funding. Tech America also named him “Legislator of the Year.”

Mr. Wieckowski is a small business owner and a bankruptcy attorney.  He has helped hundreds of families and seniors persevere through economic hardship, keep their homes and live with dignity.  He received his B.A. from the University of California and his J.D. from Santa Clara University School of Law. Senator Wieckowski lives in Fremont with his wife, Sue.

Resources:

California Senate Standing Committee on Environmental Quality

California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research – Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP)

California’s Climate Adaptation Strategy – January 2018 – Safeguarding California Plan

Local Government Commission 

 

Feb 1, 2018

Topic:

Wildfire recovery in wine country

Guest & Organization:

Chris Coursey grew up in a military family, and by the time he graduated from college had never lived in any city for more than three years. He came to Santa Rosa in 1980 to take a job that he thought would be a brief stop in his rising journalism career. Instead, he found a community that has sustained him for 37 years, and a city that has become his home town. He worked for the Santa Rosa Press Democrat for 27 years, covering a variety of subjects and writing a column sharing his personal thoughts on a wide range of community issues. In 2007, he was hired by the SMART rail district to manage communications and community outreach in advance of the successful 2008 sales tax election. He left SMART in 2011 to establish a consulting business focusing on freelance writing and public relations. 

He was elected to the Santa Rosa City Council in 2014. In December 2016, he was selected by his fellow Council members to serve as Mayor. His term expires in December 2018. 

Tennis Wick has served as Sonoma County’s Permit & Resource Management Department Director since November 2013.  The agency balances environmental protection and sustainable development of Sonoma County’s natural resources through the agency’s planning, engineering, building, well and septic, code enforcement and customer service authority.   

Before joining the County of Sonoma, Wick worked as a principal at Berg Holdings responsible for government affairs, site acquisition, design and entitlement.  Previously, Tennis practiced as a partner at the engineering and planning consulting firm CSW/Stuber-Stroeh Engineering Group, Inc.  He began his career with the County of Marin where he led current planning as Development Chief.   

Wick is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (10447) and the American Planning Association.  Tennis Wick holds a Juris Doctor degree from Golden Gate University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science with a Public Service Emphasis from the University of California, Santa Barbara. A long-time Petaluma resident, Tennis Wick has been civically active twice serving as a City Planning Commissioner and as Board President of the Friends of the Petaluma River, Petaluma Peoples Service Center and the Petaluma Area Chamber of Commerce.  Wick is also a member of the Sonoma County Farm Bureau and the Sonoma County Alliance. Tennis is part owner of Hen House Brewing Co.  He and his wife Holly have four grown daughters and are active in endurance sports, cooking and gardening. 

Resources:

Santa Rosa and Sonoma County Fire Recovery: www.sonomacountyrecovers.org 

Local Government Commission  

2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018 

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